Indiana Residents to Be Known as Hoosiers

It has been made official. Residents of Indiana will be called “Hoosiers.” They have dropped their previous nicknames of “Indianians” or “Indianans.”The federal government announced the confirmation and updated it on the U.S. Government Publishing Office on Thursday. Senator Joe Donnelly had requested for the name change. Former Senator Dan Coats backed him. He said that Indiana residents had been calling themselves Hoosiers for more than 180 years. Coats stated that the term was coined a long time ago. However, he could not explain its origin.

 

Donnelly and Coats wrote in a letter that non-Hoosiers mainly used the term “Indianian.” They stated that they found it shocking to be called “Indianian.” The senators made their request at the 31st edition of the GPO manual. The document has been the official style guide for federal records for more than a century. Other private editorial guides also use the manual.

 

In the new handbook, “Hoosier” is described as a term that refers to a native from Indiana. The list contains all the resident names of people in all the states from Alabamian to Wyomingite. Donnely was happy that the federal government would finally call them by their real name. He took the opportunity to thank all the guests and welcomed the change of names. Senator Todd Young also expressed his delight at the change of names.

 

Young stated that it was a remarkable day for the people of Indiana to be recognized rightfully by the federal government as Hoosiers. Coats and Donnelly had earlier made a shocking revelation that the Merriam-Webster dictionary defines Hoosier as an Indiana native. The word can be traced back to an Indiana newspaper of 1826. The term gained popularity through the poem “The Hoosier’s Nest” by John Finley.